Mental Health Literacy Project

Early Insights

The grant at Brooklyn College provided a trove of new information on mental health literacy, stigma and help-seeking behavior among diverse undergrad students. The final step for researchers is to shade the data in with manuscripts elaborating on observations and conclusions. The final 4 papers will be published in the Spring of 2019...but here's early insights and a link to Dr. Rabin's previous research projects.

Visit Dr. Rabin's Lab

Future Implications

Knowledge is Power

Our School Programs will be infused with data from the Brooklyn College study. Arming students, parents and educators in the high school to college pipeline with this data is crucial to painting a full picture of what mental wellness looks like and how kids can intelligently use resources as they move through that pipeline.

Curriculum Development

Dr. Rona Miles is independently developing curriculum that will take the form of a 1-credit undergrad course diving into abnormal psychology (criteria for mental health disorders, symptoms and treatment). To our knowledge, no such course exists in American institutions of higher education. Increased education has the potential to decrease stigma, improve quality of life, and teach students how and when to seek help for themselves, their family and their friends.

Learning Modules

The 3 statistically non-biased versions of the survey I mentioned above can be used to track mental health literacy rates and attitudes toward mental health stigma over time in students, parents and educators. The module is being prepared in conjunction with Dr. Rona Miles' effort to bring undergad curriculum to Brooklyn College. We plan to incorporate this into our programming in the Spring of 2019.

Future Research

Good research often poses more questions than it answers. The basis of the Mental Health Literacy Project was a 1,200 student survey around mental health literacy and help-seeking behavior in undergrads. But the rigorous process that was applied to developing those surveys (there are 3 statistically non-biased versions of the survey) provides a framework to expand the survey to other populations and study further research questions. We are evaluating future opportunities to deploy capital to responsible research projects with strong partners like Brooklyn College.

Check Out Our Other Grant

JCK Clinic in Uganda

Summary

Main Objective

Study mental health literacy among diverse undergrad students.

Amount Awarded

$32,140

Data Collection

1,272 surveys consisting of 87 questions about mental health literacy, help seeking behavior, mental health stigma and demographic information.

The Team

Drs. Laura Rabin and Rona Miles led a group of research assistants through the Psychopathology Lab at Brooklyn College. They've also been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Health and the American Psychological Foundation. Both Drs. Rabin and Miles forwent income to work on this project.

Future with Brooklyn College

We're staying closely connected with the team to help expose the process behind their work, integrate findings into our school programs and help open avenues for new research questions. Scroll down to learn more.

Publications in Progress (Spring 2019)

The grant will result in 4 final publications asking the following questions: (1) What are the barriers and facilitators to undergrads seeking help for mental stress? (2) How can we begin to eliminate the stigma on college campuses? (3) What are the base-rates of mental health literacy among undergrads and what are the implications for future research based on the new literacy questionnaire used in the grant? (4) How can we determine which variables predict mental health literacy and how will that inform any program or intervention aimed at the mental health community?

Let's Go Deeper

Before the survey was designed or administered, junior and senior researchers gathered Dr. Kelly and John Tessitore's observations and thoughts from their speaking tours. Those observations directly influenced research questions that were featured on the final surveys and will be cross-tabulated in the team's final published papers (Spring 2019). Check out the research process in more detail below.

Mental Health Literacy Project

Summary

Main Objective

Study mental health literacy among diverse undergrad students.

Amount Awarded

$32,140

Data Collection

1,272 surveys consisting of 87 questions about mental health literacy, help seeking behavior, mental health stigma and demographic information.

The Team

Drs. Laura Rabin and Rona Miles led a group of research assistants through the Psychopathology Lab at Brooklyn College. They've also been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Health and the American Psychological Foundation. Both Drs. Rabin and Miles forwent income to work on this project.

Future with Brooklyn College

We're staying closely connected with the team to help expose the process behind their work, integrate findings into our school programs and help open avenues for new research questions. Scroll down to learn more.

Publications in Progress (Spring 2019)

The grant will result in 4 final publications asking the following questions: (1) What are the barriers and facilitators to undergrads seeking help for mental stress? (2) How can we begin to eliminate the stigma on college campuses? (3) What are the base-rates of mental health literacy among undergrads and what are the implications for future research based on the new literacy questionnaire used in the grant? (4) How can we determine which variables predict mental health literacy and how will that inform any program or intervention aimed at the mental health community?

Early Insights

The grant at Brooklyn College provided a trove of new information on mental health literacy, stigma and help-seeking behavior among diverse undergrad students. The final step for researchers is to shade the data in with manuscripts elaborating on observations and conclusions. The final 4 papers will be published in the Spring of 2019...but here's early insights and a link to Dr. Rabin's previous research projects.

Future Implications

Knowledge is Power

Our School Programs will be infused with data from the Brooklyn College study. Arming students, parents and educators in the high school to college pipeline with this data is crucial to painting a full picture of what mental wellness looks like and how kids can intelligently use resources as they move through that pipeline.

Curriculum Development

Dr. Rona Miles is independently developing curriculum that will take the form of a 1-credit undergrad course diving into abnormal psychology (criteria for mental health disorders, symptoms and treatment). To our knowledge, no such course exists in American institutions of higher education. Increased education has the potential to decrease stigma, improve quality of life, and teach students how and when to seek help for themselves, their family and their friends.

Learning Modules

The 3 statistically non-biased versions of the survey I mentioned above can be used to track mental health literacy rates and attitudes toward mental health stigma over time in students, parents and educators. The module is being prepared in conjunction with Dr. Rona Miles' effort to bring undergad curriculum to Brooklyn College. We plan to incorporate this into our programming in the Spring of 2019.

Future Research

Good research often poses more questions than it answers. The basis of the Mental Health Literacy Project was a 1,200 student survey around mental health literacy and help-seeking behavior in undergrads. But the rigorous process that was applied to developing those surveys (there are 3 statistically non-biased versions of the survey) provides a framework to expand the survey to other populations and study further research questions. We are evaluating future opportunities to deploy capital to responsible research projects with strong partners like Brooklyn College.

Let's Go Deeper

Before the survey was designed or administered, junior and senior researchers gathered Dr. Kelly and John Tessitore's observations and thoughts from their speaking tours. Those observations directly influenced research questions that were featured on the final surveys and will be cross-tabulated in the team's final published papers (Spring 2019). Check out the research process in more detail below.

Check Out Our Other Grant

JCK Clinic in Uganda